Should anyone ask, warthog tastes great

On my recent trip back to South Africa, I ate a lot of meat.  I think I tried everything, from springbok carpacio to marinaded ostrich steaks.  One of the best meats was warthog.  Very succulent and far better than pork.  The following story got me remembering.  “…steaks the size of car tires…” Mmmmm.

Should anyone ask, I attend the Open Coffee Club

Every second Tuesday in Munich, I met others at the The OpenCoffee Club. It’s a get together for people who are interested in startups.  I can recommend it.  Plus it’s only an hour and a bit long so you could just pop out of the office on an “extended coffee break”.  (I don’t remember having my picture taken for this but wish they would use a better one of me)

Should anyone ask, I prefer my traffic to be “shaped”

I’m having much success with my traffic shaping rules. I prioritise my outbound traffic and graph it. Traffic is currently sorted into the following classes:
  • Leaf 10: VOIP

  • Leaf 20: ACKs, ICMP

  • Leaf 30: DNS, SSH (not scp)

  • Leaf 40: Streaming audio

  • Leaf 50: Web, SMTP, IMAP

  • Leaf 60: SCP

  • Leaf 70: Bulk, P2P, unclassified packets


This works out well:



Here the red line show’s an outbound voip call, an ongoing rsync via ssh (purple) and some random person accessing website in light green. The light blue shows a bittorrent download.

Each of these classes is subordinate to the other although each can only max out to 90% of the link before having to start sharing the link with subordinate classes.

Even if I had a T1/E1 entering my house, I’d still shape it. Shaping really enhances the responsiveness when using a congested link.

My shaping rules are downloadable and graphed. I also graph general traffic.

Should anyone ask, I prefer my traffic to be "shaped"

I’m having much success with my traffic shaping rules. I prioritise my outbound traffic and graph it. Traffic is currently sorted into the following classes:

  • Leaf 10: VOIP

  • Leaf 20: ACKs, ICMP

  • Leaf 30: DNS, SSH (not scp)

  • Leaf 40: Streaming audio

  • Leaf 50: Web, SMTP, IMAP

  • Leaf 60: SCP

  • Leaf 70: Bulk, P2P, unclassified packets


This works out well:




Here the red line show’s an outbound voip call, an ongoing rsync via ssh (purple) and some random person accessing website in light green. The light blue shows a bittorrent download.

Each of these classes is subordinate to the other although each can only max out to 90% of the link before having to start sharing the link with subordinate classes.

Even if I had a T1/E1 entering my house, I’d still shape it. Shaping really enhances the responsiveness when using a congested link.

My shaping rules are downloadable and graphed. I also graph general traffic.

Should anyone ask, these are places I've lived at

I was playing with Google’s “My places” feature.  I made a quick map of all the places I’ve lived at.

Should anyone ask, bunker filters lots of spam

Spammers are turning to image spam to avoid filters.  The introduction of grey-listing has dramatically reduced imaginator.com spam but in the end spam protection is a never ending arms race - until someone comes up with a new way to do email.  And that ain’t happening any time soon.I’ve been graphing bunker’s mail statistics. The mail server is rejecting up to 40 messages a minute, and that’s before they even hit the spam filter, the virus filter, a content filter and finally get accepted for delivery.  So the odd one that gets through has had to pass lots of tests. Consider it special…

Should anyone ask, this is where ships go to die

Ever wonder what happens to tanker ships at the end of their life? Foreign Policy magazine has a nice photo essay.

When the tide is high, vessels are
driven at full speed toward the shore. Once the water recedes and the
ships rest along the muddy beach, the salvage crews move in, emptying
the vessels of everything on board.

End of the Line for ships

Should anyone ask, it's time for a new look at networking

A New Way to look at Networking is the name of an interesting talk given by Van Jacoson Van Jacobson is a Research Fellow at PARC. Prior to that he was Chief Scientist and co-founder ofĂ‚ Packet Design. Prior to that he was Chief Scientist at Cisco. Prior to that he was head of the Network Research group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. He’s been studying networking since 1969. He still hopes that someday something will start to make sense.



He gives an interesting critique of TCP/IP today and suggests how it is broken and can be fixed.



Link here

Should anyone ask, Buddycloud has a website (Google please take note)

Google bait.

Should anyone ask, today's lucky numbers are: 09 F9 11 02 9d 74 E3 5b D8 41 56 C5 63 56 88 C0

The New York times has the story: New York Times.more links here: Google

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Should anyone ask, on building strong teams

My thinking about building strong teams My work goal is: work with smart people, on interesting problems, that improve our lives. So I start...